OSHA 300A Summary Posting Reminder

It’s that time of year when employers are required to tally the number of entries on their “Log of Work-related Injuries and Illnesses” (OSHA Form 300), and post the “Summary of Work-related Injuries and Illnesses” (OSHA Form 300A) in a prominent location.

The OSHA Summary Form 300A is required to be posted in the workplace beginning Feb. 1, 2018, and must remain posted for the entire three months of February, March, and April. It should be in an easily visible location so that employees are aware of the injuries and illnesses occurring in their workplace.

Employers that had 11 or more employees the previous year — except those in certain low-hazard establishments in the retail, professional services, finance and real estate sectors — are required to maintain records of all work-related injuries and illnesses, and post the summary of their records for the 2017 calendar year.

Many employers under Federal OSHA are required to electronically submit the summary of injuries and illnesses to OSHA. To ensure your entire management team is aware of these changes, I suggest making OSHA’s Recordkeeping Rule one of your first training sessions of the new year.

The Flu is Running Rampant! Don’t Let it Impact Your Business

California health officials said last week that the state’s flu season could turn out to be one of the nastiest the state has seen in the last ten years. “I was flat on my back and in bed for 10 days,” said one So Cal resident. “This has been hands down the worst flu I’ve ever dealt with.”

When someone in your household comes down with the flu, there’s a good chance others in the house will catch it too based on their exposure and close proximity. The same applies to the office or workplace.

An outbreak at the office can also seriously affect your business operations. All it takes is one infected to put others at risk and spread the virus. Fewer hands on deck could potentially impact productivity and operations.

Here are Five Tips for Business Owners to Help Reduce the Potential Spread of the Flu:

Consult the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for additional suggestions on preventing the flu and maintaining good health habits. The more proactive you are, the greater likelihood you’ll have in decreasing the flu exposure and maintaining your company productivity and operations.

-JK

California State Treasurer Unrolls Business Incentives Program

Yesterday, California State Treasurer John Chiang introduced the California Business Incentives Gateway, an online resource connecting business owners and entrepreneurs with resources to help them grow, including employee training, assistance with permitting and sales tax exclusions.

The California Business Incentives Gateway (CBIG) is a tool from the State Treasurer’s Office that brings together all of the state and local business development incentives to a single access point.

See more here:

-JK

Video: Why You Should Water Your Christmas Tree

We’re officially five days away from Christmas which means that a lot of us have had their Christmas trees up in the house for a good month now. That plush vibrant green tree you bought from the local tree lot is now looking slightly brown and dried out by now. Sure, it looks pretty with all the lights and ornaments masking it, but behind the decorations be aware of the fuel load the tree brings into your home like this one here:

You don’t want this to be your tree, so for a list of 12 precautions you can take when choosing and decorating a tree, visit this link from The Travelers Indemnity Company.

-JK

Three Laws For California Employers To Know In 2018

This week, the California Chamber of Commerce released a video report highlighting three new laws impacting employers that go into effect in 2018. They include:

  1. a law requiring small employers to provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid parental leave;
  2. a law restricting the types of salary questions employers can ask applicants;
  3. and a law restricting employers’ abilities to conduct background checks or inquire about prior convictions for potential new employees.

(Source & additional information on these new laws: CalChamber)

-JK

Workers’ Compensation Fraud Billboard in San Diego

During a quick day trip down to San Diego last weekend, I caught this billboard from the San Diego County District Attorney which kind of took me by surprise. Picturing a handcuffed jail inmate it reads “Commit Workers’ Comp Fraud, Get A New Outfit.” In addition, “don’t do it, don’t tolerate it, report it” with a phone number to call right there. As a commercial insurance professional who sees’s businesses affected by this often, it was kind of refreshing to see actually. Here’s the sign:

Work Comp Fraud

Taken straight from the California Department of Insurance:

In California, workers’ compensation insurance is a no-fault system. Injured employees need not prove an injury was someone else’s fault in order to receive workers’ compensation benefits for an on-the-job injury. In addition to medical expenses being covered for injured employees, some injured workers are entitled to recover a portion of lost wages resulting from an injury. Fraudulent workers’ compensation claims can be an enticing target for criminals.

Workers’ compensation insurance fraud occurs in simple and complex schemes that often require difficult and lengthy investigations. Employees may exaggerate or even fabricate injuries. At the other end of the spectrum, white-collar criminals, including doctors and lawyers, entice, pay, and conspire with others to defraud the system by creating false or exaggerated claims, overtreating, and over prescribing harmful and addictive drugs. Insurance companies “pick up the tab,” passing the cost onto policyholders, taxpayers, and the general public.

The Workers’ Compensation Fraud Program was established in 1991. The legislature made workers’ compensation fraud a felony, required insurers to report suspected fraud, and established a mechanism for funding enforcement and prosecution activities. The legislation established the Fraud Assessment Commission to determine the level of assessments to fund investigation and prosecution of workers’ compensation insurance fraud.

Funding for the program comes from California employers who are legally required to be insured or self-insured. The total aggregate assessment for the fiscal year 2015-16 was $58,862,000.

During the fiscal year 2015-16, the Fraud Division identified and reported 5,380 suspected fraud cases; (SFCs) assigned 502 new cases, made 249 arrests and referred 167 cases to prosecuting authorities. Potential loss amounted to $193,354,616.

Workers’ Compensation Fraud Convictions

-JK

California has become the latest state to outlaw the ‘previous salary’ question.

California joins Delaware, Massachusetts, Oregon, and several cities (including San Francisco) in passing laws preventing employers from asking prospective workers for their salary history. If asked, companies must also provide a pay range for the job in question. The new law, which comes into effect January 1, aims to curb the gender pay gap by keeping low salaries from following women through their careers.

-JK

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