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Drunk Driver Nearly Causes Multiple Accidents – Ends Up Crashing

Check out this cliff-hanger video. This drunk driver nearly causes multiple accidents but ends up crashing and putting his/her own life in jeopardy. Some tense moments on this two lane highway!

According to Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), out of every three traffic deaths involve drunk driving. Every 53 minutes on average, someone is killed in a drunk driving crash (9,878 people in total in 2011). Every 90 seconds, someone is injured because of this entirely preventable crime.

About one-third of the drunk driving problem – arrests, crashes, deaths, and injuries – comes from repeat offenders. At any given point we potentially share the roads with 2 million people with three or more drunk driving offenses.

What to do when you spot an Impaired Driver

  • Stay far behind the suspected drunk driver.
  • Get out of the way and expect the unexpected.
  • Wear your safety belt (and make sure that any children or other passengers have their safety belts fastened as well) – It is one of your best defenses against a drunk driver.
  • Stop right away and look for a phone.
  • Report suspected and impaired drivers to the California Highway Patrol or local police by dialing 911. Give the location, direction of travel, and description of the car and driver’s behavior.

What NOT to do when you spot an Impaired Driver

  • Do not try to pass the car!
  • Do not try to stop the vehicle.
  • Do not follow too closely. The car may stop abruptly.
  • Do not attempt to act in the capacity of the police.
  • Do not try to detain or confront the driver.
  • Call the local police or 911 and let them take care of it!

Most of the time, the signs of a drunk driver aren’t as obvious as the white Ranger in this video. Stay alert on the roads out there!

JK

Rolling Deep…Literally

I found this picture on Google+ today. Talking about rolling deep! Check this guy out…

Rolling Deep

Thinking about purchasing a used car? If so, protect yourself from buying a flood damaged vehicle by doing a little research and by having the vehicle thoroughly checked by a mechanic.

Every year, tens of thousands of cars are damaged by floodwaters and more than half end up back on the road. Damaged cars are often repaired cosmetically and moved to adjacent states or other areas of the country where many are sold to unsuspecting consumers. These floodwaters can cause damage to a vehicle’s computer and electrical systems, as well as potentially causing anti-lock braking and airbag systems to malfunction.

Used Car Buying Tips: Detecting and Avoiding Flood Damaged Vehicles (from CARFAX Vehicle History Reports)

To help you avoid cars with water damage, CARFAX offers these tips:

  • Check the trunk, glove compartment, the dashboard and below the seats for signs of water damage such as silt, mud or rust.
  • Examine upholstery and carpeting closely; if it doesn’t match the interior or fits loosely, it may have been replaced. Discolored, faded or stained materials could indicate water damage.
  • Turn the ignition key and make sure that accessory and warning lights and gauges come on and work properly. Make sure the airbag and ABS lights come on.
  • Test lights (interior and exterior), windshield wipers, turn signals, cigarette lighter, radio, heater and air conditioner several times to make sure they work.
  • Flex some of the wires beneath the dashboard. Wet wires will become brittle upon drying and may crack.
  • Take a deep breath and smell for musty odors from mildew.
  • Go to a trusted mechanic for a pre-purchase inspection. Always get vehicles checked BEFORE handing over any money.
  • Ask to see a vehicle history report.

Facts: Flood Damage from Hurricanes and Tropical Storms

  •  Hurricane Floyd (1999) damaged 75,000 vehicles and than half were put back out on the road.
  • Tropical Storm Allison (2001) – More than 95,000 vehicles flooded by the most extensive tropical storm in U.S. history.
  • Hurricane Ivan (2004) – Left more than 100,000 cars submerged in floodwaters throughout the Southeast.
  • Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Rita and Hurricane Wilma (2005) – claimed more than 600,000 cars across the Gulf Coast. Many of these cars still are showing up for sale around the country.
  • Hurricane Ike (2008) – more than 100,000 cars in Texas and Louisiana, from Galveston and Houston over to Baton Rouge, were left underwater.

If all else fails, you can do what the dude above did and you won’t have to worry about flood damage to your car.

JK

What To Do In the Event of An Insurance Claim

When you deal with an incident that gives rise to an insurance claim, it’s usually a pretty crappy situation. It can be stressful, terrifying, frightening, and alarming in many cases. First things first, try not to panic. Hopefully it’s an incident you carry insurance for to be protected.

Your insurance contract requires that you report all claims promptly. Contact your insurance carrier or broker as possible after a property, liability, worker’s comp or automobile claim. An insurance company claims adjuster will be assigned to handle your claim. You should then be able to deal directly with the adjuster to settle your claim, but your broker can be there with you to assist you along the way.

Here’s step-by-step suggestions on how you should handle property, liability, workers compensation, and auto insurance claims.

Property Claims

In the event of damage to your building or contents:

  1. Protect the property from further damage:
    • Call the proper authorities and utilities (gas, electric, telephone).
    • Take photos of the damage before having emergency repairs made, such as boarding up windows or covering holes in the roof.
  2. Call your insurance broker or carrier to report the loss.
  3. Call a contractor to estimate the building damages.
  4. Separate damaged contents from undamaged contents. Do not discard any items until the claims adjuster gives you the authority to do so.
  5. Keep records of expenses if you are forced to temporarily relocate your business.
  6. Do not authorize repairs until the claims adjuster has given you the authority to do so.

After the claim is reported to the insurance company, the claims adjuster will:

  1. Contact you by phone or mail to discuss the loss
  2. Arrange for an appraiser to inspect extensively damaged property
  3. Assist you with your choice of contractors to make the repairs
  4. Contact you for a settlement

Liability Claims

In the event of injuries or damage to property of others which you allegedly caused:

  1. Call your insurance broker or carrier to report the claim.
  2. Forward any correspondence, including a summons from an attorney representing the other party.
  3. Do not discuss the claim with the other party or their attorney. Refer them to your insurance company’s claims adjuster or to us.

After the claim is reported to the insurance company, the claims adjuster will:

  1. Contact you to discuss the incident that allegedly caused the injury or damage to the property
  2. Deal directly with the other party and/or attorney to handle the claim

Workers’ Compensation Claims

In the event an employee is injured on the job:

  1. Complete the Employer’s First Report of Injury or Disease form for all claims. Either use the “call in” reporting system or fax the original form to the insurance company.
  2. Forward a copy of the First Report to your broker in the event of a disabling injury or death claim. They should follow-up with the insurance company for their prompt handling of the claim.
  3. Contact the insurance company to question the status of a claim. If you experience delays or have questions, contact your broker for assistance.

After you report the claim to the insurance company, the claims adjuster will:

  1. Contact the injured employee to discuss the accident
  2. Request copies of bills and doctors’ reports for medical treatment administered
  3. Contact you, the employer, if there is any lost time from work as a result of the injury

Auto Insurance Claims

In the event of an automobile accident:

  1. Report the accident to the police.
  2. Obtain information about the other people involved in the accident such as:
    1. Names, addresses and phone numbers
    2. Insurance company
    3. Type of vehicle
    4. Auto and driver’s license numbers.
  3. Have your vehicle towed to the nearest repair shop if the vehicle is not drivable. Do not authorize repairs until the claims adjuster gives you the authority to do so.
  4. Call your insurance broker or carrier to report the accident.

In the event of a windshield, vandalism or theft loss:

  1. Report the vandalism loss or theft to the police.
  2. Call us to report a loss.

After the claim is reported to the insurance company, the claims adjuster will:

  1. Contact you to request details of the accident and repair estimates
  2. Arrange for an appraiser to inspect the damages of vehicles that are not drivable or extensively damaged
    1. Contact you for a settlement
    2. Deal directly with the others involved in the accident

You should not talk to others involved in the accident, but refer them to your claims adjuster.

-JK

Source: Zywave, Inc.

Video – Car Crashing into House

Stupidity of others is up there on the list of reasons why you should carry home and auto insurance.

You might wonder sometimes why you ever carry home and auto insurance. “It can never happen to me” right?

Perhaps…until this guy comes driving down your block

Need a review of your home, auto, or renters insurance policies?

Call me! I can do that too.

-JK

Soooo…. I’ll Never Drive Behind A Big Rig Ever Again

Watch this video and you’ll be thinking a lot differently about your commute home tonight!

Most underride guards fail to stop deadly crashes

-JK

10 Good Questions To Ask About Business Auto Insurance

On any given workday, you may have employees on the road operating a variety of vehicles. Whether you provide company vehicles or your employees use their own vehicles, commercial auto insurance is a must.

Commercial/ business auto insurance provides coverage for cars, trucks and vans used by you or your employees for business purposes. Your business vehicles are not covered by your businessowners policy or personal auto insurance, so you must buy a separate policy.

When shopping for the right coverage for your business, here are ten good questions to ask about business auto insurance:

1. Is coverage mandatory for a business that uses vehicles?

Yes. Just like with personal auto insurance, it’s against the law to drive a vehicle without insurance to cover injuries or damage to others that an employee causes as a result of a car accident.

2. Is Business Auto Insurance better than Personal Insurance?

Business Auto coverage is similar to the coverage you may carry on your personal auto policy; however, business auto exposures can be more complex requiring specialty coverages to be considered based on individual business needs.

3. How do I find out about what’s out there?

The most effective way to compare rates and coverage available to you is through an independent agent or broker. They should be able to point you to the right type of policy based on the type of business you have and how you use your vehicles.

 4. What can I do to influence the premium I pay?

The best ways to keep rates down is to make sure that you’re a safe driver, hire and employ safe drivers and use less expensive vehicles for your business.

5. What factors impact the premium I pay for Business Auto Insurance?

Insurance premiums can be affected by everything from the type of business you operate, to the type of vehicles you own; to the radius you operate your business in, and the driving records of yourself and your employees.

6. What is the reputation of the insurance company?

Make sure you do the research before moving forward with a Business Auto policy. Ask your insurance representative or go online to answer questions like — Do they have a long history? Are they reputable? Do they know your business?

7. What extra benefits are added onto the policy without additional cost?

Every insurance company is different. So make sure to ask about extra benefits when shopping around, because they could prove useful when an accident happens and save you money in the long run.

8. Does coverage vary state to state?

It definitely can. Each state has its own rules and regulations that can affect rates and types of coverage that an insurance carrier can make available to your business.

9. Are all my employees covered by my Business Insurance policy?

They should be, but there are exceptions. This is a very important question to ask when you’re shopping around for the best Business Auto policy.

10. How does the claims process work?

The process usually includes reporting an accident to both the police and your insurance company, assessing the damage, and working with a claims handler. When selecting an insurance carrier, be sure to ask about any benefits they offer in the event of an accident, like a network of repair shops where the work is guaranteed as long as the vehicle is leased or owned.

Source: The Hartford 

Large California Traffic Ticket Fines Effective 01/06/2012

If you’re a California driver, pay close attention to this one. The Golden State of California is broke and is looking for ways to pay some bills. Aside from raising taxes like our brilliant politicians up in Sacramento like to do as a “solution” to all our fiscal problems, they looking to the highways to generate some revenue for their pockets.

Take note of the following California traffic ticket fines which took effect on Friday, 1/6. Sorry, I’m a few days late on this. I received this information from an email. Apparently, these details were taken from an article in the L.A. Times. I tried to find it but no luck. If you come across the story, please send to me so I can give some credit to where it’s due.

Rumor has it that the California Highway Patrol is under pressure to issue a lot more tickets than last year with at least 30% increase in fines over 2009, so beware of radar guns, highway and traffic cameras installed everywhere and the tougher enforcement of parking rules.

Traffic Ticket Fines (Effective 01/06/2012)

  • VC 12814.6 $214 Failure to obey license provisions
  • VC 14600(A) $214 Failure to notify DMV of address change within 10 days Note: The fine may be reduced with valid proof of correction.
  • VC 16028(A) $796 Failure to provide evidence of financial responsibility (insurance) Note: This fine may be reduced with proof of insurance on or after the violation date.
  • VC 21453(A) $436 Failure to stop at a red signal.
  • VC 22349 $214 Unsafe speed, 1 to 15 miles over the limit.
  • VC 22350 $328 Unsafe speed, 16 to 25 miles over the limit.
  • VC 22450 $214 Failure to stop at a stop sign.
  • VC 22454(A) $616 Passing a school bus with flashing red signals.
  • VC 23123(A) $148 Driving while using a wireless phone not hands free, first offense.
  • VC 23123(B) $256 Driving while using a wireless phone not hands not free, each subsequent offense.
  • VC 23123.5 $148 Driving while using a wireless device to send, read or write text.
  • VC 23124 $148 Minor driving while using a wireless phone.
  • VC 22500 $976 Parking in a bus loading area.
  • VC 22507(A) $976 Violation of disabled parking provisions, first offense.
  • VC 22507(B) $1876 Violation of disabled parking provisions, second offense.
  • VC 26708 $178 Unlawful material on vehicle windows.
  • VC 27150 $178 Adequate muffler required.
  • VC 27315 $148 Mandatory use of seat belts.
  • VC 27360 $436 Mandatory use of passenger child restraints. Note: This fine may be reduced by completing a court authorized child seat diversion program.
  • VC 27400 $178 Headsets or Earplugs covering both ears.
  • VC 27803 $178 Violation of motorcycle safety helmet requirements.
  • VC 34506 $616 Commercial Driver – Log book violation.
  • VC 4000 $256 No evidence of current registration. Note: The fine may be reduced with valid proof of correction.
  •  VC 4159 $178 Notify DMV of change of address within 10 days. Note: The fine may be reduced with valid proof of correction.
  • VC 5200 $178 Proper display of license plates. Note: The fine may be reduced with valid proof of correction.
  • VC 9400 $178 Commercial weight fees due. Note: The fine may be reduced with valid proof of correction

So what do you think? Will these California traffic ticket fines convince you to be more cautious on the road?

-JK

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